The Sympathies of the Long Married

Robert Bly

 
Oh well, let's go on eating the grains of eternity.
What do we care about improvements in travel?
Angels sometimes cross the river on old turtles.
Shall we worry about who gets left behind?
That one bird flying through the clouds is enough.
Your sweet face at the door of the house is enough.
The two farm horses stubbornly pull the wagon.
The mad crows carry away the tablecloth.
Most of the time, we live through the night.
Let's not drive the wild angels from our door.
Maybe the mad fields of grain will move.
Maybe the troubled rocks will learn to walk.
It's all right if we're troubled by the night.
It's all right if we can't recall our own name.
It's all right if this rough music keeps on playing.
I've given up worrying about men living alone.
I do worry about the couple who live next door.
Some words heard through the screen door are enough.
 
From Talking into the Ear of a Donkey, published by W.W. Norton. Copyright 2011 by Robert Bly. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

Poems by This Author

Two ramages for old masters [Silent in the moonlight] by Robert Bly
Advice From the Geese by Robert Bly
Poem for Andrew Marvell by Robert Bly
The Greek Ships by Robert Bly
What Things Want by Robert Bly
You have to let things


Further Reading

Poems for Anniversaries
A Man Meets a Woman in the Street
by Randall Jarrell
Couple Sharing a Peach
by Molly Peacock
Earth Tremors Felt in Missouri
by Mona Van Duyn
Francesco and Clare
by David St. John
I Married You
by Linda Pastan
Let Me Disappear
by Ray Gonzalez
Looking Back in My Eighty-First Year
by Maxine Kumin
Man and Wife
by Robert Lowell
My Wife
by Robert Louis Stevenson
Orpheus
by Robert Kelly
The Anniversary
by John Donne
The Anniversary
by Elaine Terranova
The Elephant is Slow to Mate
by D.H. Lawrence
The Storm
by Theodore Roethke
To My Dear and Loving Husband
by Anne Bradstreet