The Hesperides

Lord Alfred Tennyson

 
Hesperus and his daughters three
That sing about the golden tree.
                          Comus, Milton
The North-wind fall'n, in the new starréd night
Zidonian Hanno, voyaging beyond
The hoary promontory of Soloë
Past Thymiaterion, in calméd bays,
Between the Southern and the western Horn,
Heard neither warbling of the nightingale,
Nor melody of the Lybian lotus flute
Blown seaward from the shore; but from a slope
That ran bloom-bright into the Atlantic blue,
Beneath a highland leaning down a weight
Of cliffs, and zoned below with cedar shade,
Came voices, like the voices in a dream,
Continuous, till he reached the other sea.
 

Poems by This Author

In Memoriam, Epilogue, [O true and tried, so well and long] by Lord Alfred Tennyson
O true and tried, so well and long
In Memoriam, [Ring out, wild bells] by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky
In Memoriam, [To Sleep I give my powers away] by Lord Alfred Tennyson
To Sleep I give my powers away
Break, Break, Break by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Break, break, break
Crossing the Bar by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Sunset and evening star
from The Princess [Sweet and low, sweet and low] by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Sweet and low, sweet and low,
Tears, Idle Tears by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean
The Charge of the Light Brigade by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Half a league, half a league
The Eagle by Lord Alfred Tennyson
He clasps the crag with crooked hands
The Kraken by Lord Alfred Tennyson
Below the thunders of the upper deep
The Lady of Shalott by Lord Alfred Tennyson
On either side the river lie
The Splendor Falls by Lord Alfred Tennyson
The splendor falls on castle walls
Tithonus by Lord Alfred Tennyson
The woods decay, the woods decay and fall
Ulysses by Lord Alfred Tennyson
It little profits that an idle king,