The Merchant of Venice, Act IV, Scene I [The quality of mercy is not strained]

William Shakespeare

 
The quality of mercy is not strained;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:
'T is mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown:
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway;
It is enthronèd in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself;
And earthly power doth then show likest God's
When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,
Though justice be thy plea, consider this,
That, in the course of justice, none of us
Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy;
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much
To mitigate the justice of thy plea;
Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice
Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.
 

Poems by This Author

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act II, Scene I [Over hill, over dale] by William Shakespeare
Over hill, over dale
Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, Scene II [The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne] by William Shakespeare
I will tell you
As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII [All the world's a stage] by William Shakespeare
All the world's a stage
As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII [Blow, blow, thou winter wind] by William Shakespeare
Blow, blow, thou winter wind
Hamlet, Act I, Scene I [Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes] by William Shakespeare
Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
Hamlet, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] by William Shakespeare
To be, or not to be: that is the question
Hamlet, Act III, Scene III [Oh my offence is rank] by William Shakespeare
O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven
Hamlet, Act IV, Scene IV [How all occasions do inform against me] by William Shakespeare
How all occasions do inform against me
Henry V, Act III, Scene I [One more unto the breach, dear friends] by William Shakespeare
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more
Henry V, Act V, Scene III [What's he that wishes so?] by William Shakespeare
What's he that wishes so
King Lear, Act III, Scene II [Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks!] by William Shakespeare
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
Love's Labour's Lost, Act V, Scene 2 [Winter] by William Shakespeare
When icicles hang by the wall
Macbeth, Act I, Scene II [The merciless Macdonwald] by William Shakespeare
The merciless Macdonwald
Macbeth, Act IV, Scene I [Round about the cauldron go] by William Shakespeare
Round about the cauldron go
Romeo and Juliet, Act III, Scene II by William Shakespeare
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds
Tempest, Act V, Scene I [Where the bee sucks, there suck I] by William Shakespeare
Where the bee sucks, there suck I
The Winter's Tale Act IV, Scene II [When daffodils begin to peer] by William Shakespeare
When daffodils begin to peer
Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene III [O Mistress mine, where are you roaming?] by William Shakespeare
O Mistress mine, where are you roaming
Venus and Adonis [But, lo! from forth a copse] by William Shakespeare
But, lo! from forth a copse that neighbours by,
From you have I been absent in the spring... (Sonnet 98) by William Shakespeare
From you have I been absent in the spring,
How like a winter hath my absence been (Sonnet 97) by William Shakespeare
How like a winter hath my absence been
Let me not to the marriage of true minds (Sonnet 116) by William Shakespeare
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck (Sonnet 14) by William Shakespeare
Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck,
Not marble nor the guilded monuments (Sonnet 55) by William Shakespeare
Not marble nor the gilded monuments
Orpheus by William Shakespeare
Orpheus with his lute made trees
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? (Sonnet 18) by William Shakespeare
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea (Sonnet 65) by William Shakespeare
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea
That time of year thou mayst in me behold (Sonnet 73) by William Shakespeare
That time of year thou mayst in me behold
The expense of spirit in a waste of shame (Sonnet 129) by William Shakespeare
The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
They that have power to hurt and will do none (Sonnet 94) by William Shakespeare
They that have power to hurt and will do none
Three Songs by William Shakespeare
Come unto these yellow sands,
Tired with all these, for restful death I cry (Sonnet 66) by William Shakespeare
Tired with all these, for restful death I cry
When I consider every thing that grows (Sonnet 15) by William Shakespeare
When I consider every thing that grows
When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes (Sonnet 29) by William Shakespeare
When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes
When that I was and a little tiny boy by William Shakespeare
When that I was and a little tiny boy
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought (Sonnet 30) by William Shakespeare
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought