I
Swiftly walk o'er the western wave,
            Spirit of the Night!
Out of the misty eastern cave,
Where, all the long and lone daylight,
Thou wovest dreams of joy and fear,
Which make thee terrible and dear,—
            Swift be thy flight!
                       II
Wrap thy form in a mantle gray,
            Star-inwrought!
Blind with thine hair the eyes of Day;
Kiss her until she be wearied out,
Then wander o'er city, and sea, and land,
Touching all with thine opiate wand—
            Come, long-sought!
                       III
When I arose and saw the dawn,
            I sighed for thee;
When light rode high, and the dew was gone,
And noon lay heavy on flower and tree,
And the weary Day turned to his rest,
Lingering like an unloved guest,
            I sighed for thee.
                       IV
Thy brother Death came, and cried,
            Wouldst thou me?
Thy sweet child Sleep, the filmy-eyed,
Murmured like a noontide bee,
Shall I nestle near thy side?
Wouldst thou me?—And I replied,
            No, not thee!
                       V
Death will come when thou art dead,
            Soon, too soon—
Sleep will come when thou art fled;
Of neither would I ask the boon
I ask of thee, belovèd Night—
Swift be thine approaching flight,
            Come soon, soon!
 

Poems by This Author

Adonais, 49-52, [Go thou to Rome] by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Go thou to Rome,--at once the Paradise
An Exhortation by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Chameleons feed on light and air:
England in 1819 by Percy Bysshe Shelley
An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king
Lines: 'When the Lamp is Shattered' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
When the lamp is shattered
Love's Philosophy by Percy Bysshe Shelley
The fountains mingle with the river
Mutability by Percy Bysshe Shelley
We are as clouds that veil the midnight moon
Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley
O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being,
On the Medusa of Leonardo Da Vinci in the Florentine Gallery by Percy Bysshe Shelley
It lieth, gazing on the midnight sky
Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley
I met a traveller from an antique land
Stanzas Written in Dejection, Near Naples by Percy Bysshe Shelley
The sun is warm, the sky is clear
The Call of the Open by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Which yet joined not scent to hue
The Mask of Anarchy [Excerpt] by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Stand ye calm and resolute
To a Skylark by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Hail to thee, blithe Spirit
To the Moon [fragment] by Percy Bysshe Shelley
Art thou pale for weariness


Further Reading

Poems about Night
A Clear Midnight
by Walt Whitman
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight
by Vachel Lindsay
Acquainted with the Night
by Robert Frost
At Deep Midnight
by Minnie Bruce Pratt
At Night
by Yone Noguchi
At Night the States
by Alice Notley
Breaking Across Us Now
by Katie Ford
Flying at Night
by Ted Kooser
Hard Night
by Christian Wiman
Hellish Night
by Arthur Rimbaud
Here and Now
by Stephen Dunn
Hymn to the Night
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
In the City of Night
by John Gould Fletcher
La Noche
by Anselm Hollo
Last
by Maxine Scates
Late Night Ode
by J. D. McClatchy
Let Evening Come
by Jane Kenyon
Meeting at Night
by Robert Browning
Mother Night
by James Weldon Johnson
Night
by Carsten René Nielsen
Night Air
by C. Dale Young
Night Blooming Jasmine
by Giovanni Pascoli
Night Drafts
by Tony Sanders
Night Funeral in Harlem
by Langston Hughes
Night Songs
by Thomas Kinsella
Nights On The Peninsula
by D. Nurkse
On a Night Like This
by Michael Teig
One Night
by Mathias Svalina
Radar Data #12
by Lytton Smith
Rhapsody on a Windy Night
by T. S. Eliot
Sawdust
by Sharon Bryan
Ships That Pass in the Night
by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Summer Night, Riverside
by Sara Teasdale
Summer Stars
by Carl Sandburg
The First Night
by Billy Collins
The Sun Has Long Been Set
by William Wordsworth
Unity
by Pablo Neruda
Window
by Carl Sandburg