How do you like to go up in a swing,
             Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
             Ever a child can do!
Up in the air and over the wall,
             Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
             Over the countryside—
Till I look down on the garden green,
              Down on the roof so brown—
Up in the air I go flying again,
              Up in the air and down!
 

Poems by This Author

After Reading "Antony and Cleopatra" by Robert Louis Stevenson
As when the hunt by holt and field
Bed in Summer by Robert Louis Stevenson
In winter I get up at night
Block City by Robert Louis Stevenson
What are you able to build with your blocks?
Christmas at Sea by Robert Louis Stevenson
The sheets were frozen hard, and they cut the naked hand
Envoy by Robert Louis Stevenson
Go, little book, and wish to all
My House, I Say by Robert Louis Stevenson
My house, I say. But hark to the sunny doves
My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson
I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me
My Wife by Robert Louis Stevenson
Trusty, dusky, vivid, true
Picture-books in Winter by Robert Louis Stevenson
Summer fading, winter comes
Pirate Story by Robert Louis Stevenson
Three of us afloat in the meadow by the swing
Requiem by Robert Louis Stevenson
Under the wide and starry sky
Summer Sun by Robert Louis Stevenson
Great is the sun, and wide he goes
The Celestial Surgeon by Robert Louis Stevenson
If I have faltered more or less
The Dumb Soldier by Robert Louis Stevenson
When the grass was closely mown,
The Land of Counterpane by Robert Louis Stevenson
When I was sick and lay a-bed
The Land of Nod by Robert Louis Stevenson
From Breakfast on through all the day
The Land of Story-books by Robert Louis Stevenson
At evening when the lamp is lit
The Sick Child by Robert Louis Stevenson
O Mother, lay your hand on my brow!
To My Mother by Robert Louis Stevenson
You too, my mother, read my rhymes
Travel by Robert Louis Stevenson
I should like to rise and go
Underwoods: Epigram by Robert Louis Stevenson
Of all my verse, like not a single line
Where Go the Boats? by Robert Louis Stevenson
Dark brown is the river
Windy Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson
Whenever the moon and stars are set
Winter-Time by Robert Louis Stevenson
Late lies the wintry sun a-bed


Further Reading

Poems About Childhood
"Out, Out—"
by Robert Frost
Don't Let Me Be Lonely [There was a time]
by Claudia Rankine
A Boy Juggling a Soccer Ball
by Christopher Merrill
A child said, What is the grass?
by Walt Whitman
Another Country
by Ryan Teitman
anyone lived in a pretty how town
by E. E. Cummings
Babylon
by Robert Graves
Because I cannot remember my first kiss
by Roger Bonair-Agard
Birches
by Robert Frost
Block City
by Robert Louis Stevenson
Blur
by Andrew Hudgins
Childhood is the Kingdom Where Nobody Dies
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
deer & salt block
by Joshua Marie Wilkinson
Early Memory
by January Gill O'Neil
Fern Hill
by Dylan Thomas
Fifteen, Maybe Sixteen Things to Worry About
by Judith Viorst
For Some Slight I Can't Quite Recall
by Ross Gay
From the Lives of My Friends
by Michael Dickman
Giraffes
by Kimiko Hahn
Going Down Hill on a Bicycle
by Henry Charles Beeching
In the Waiting Room
by Elizabeth Bishop
Jabberwocky
by Lewis Carroll
Lullaby in Blue
by Betsy Sholl
My Aunts
by Meghan O'Rourke
My Bright Aluminum Tumblers
by Michael Ryan
My Childhood
by Matthew Zapruder
Ode on Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
by William Wordsworth
Pirate Story
by Robert Louis Stevenson
Playgrounds
by Laurence Alma-Tadema
Pledge
by Elizabeth Powell
Poem for You
by David Shapiro
Recuerdo
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Solar system bedsheets
by Sarah Vap
The Children's Hour
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
The Gaffe
by C. K. Williams
The Lamb
by William Blake
The Portrait
by Stanley Kunitz
The Retreat
by Henry Vaughan
The Tower
by W. B. Yeats
They Call This
by C. K. Williams
To My Best Friend's Big Sister
by Ross Gay
Untitled [The child thought it strange]
by Richard Meier
Untitled [You mustn't swim till you're six weeks old]
by Rudyard Kipling
We Are Seven
by William Wordsworth