Lovers' Infiniteness

John Donne

 
If yet I have not all the love,
Dear, I shall never have it all,
I cannot breathe one other sigh, to move,
Nor can entreat one other tear to fall.
All my treasure, which should purchase thee,
Sighs, tears, and oaths, and letters I have spent,
Yet no more can be due to me,
Than at the bargain made was meant.
If then thy gift of love were partial,
That some to me, some should to others fall,
     Dear, I shall never have thee all.
Or if then thou gavest me all,
All was but all, which thou hadst then;
But if in thy heart, since, there be or shall
New love created be, by other men,
Which have their stocks entire, and can in tears,
In sighs, in oaths, and letters outbid me,
This new love may beget new fears,
For, this love was not vowed by thee.
And yet it was, thy gift being general,
The ground, thy heart is mine; whatever shall
     Grow there, dear, I should have it all.
Yet I would not have all yet,
He that hath all can have no more,
And since my love doth every day admit
New growth, thou shouldst have new rewards in store;
Thou canst not every day give me thy heart,
If thou canst give it, then thou never gav'st it;
Love's riddles are, that though thy heart depart,
It stays at home, and thou with losing sav'st it:
But we will have a way more liberal,
Than changing hearts, to join them, so we shall
     Be one, and another's all.
 

Poems by This Author

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne
As virtuous men pass mildly away,
Air and Angels by John Donne
Twice or thrice had I loved thee,
Ascension by John Donne
Salute the last, and everlasting day
At the round earth's imagined corners (Holy Sonnet 7) by John Donne
At the round earth's imagin'd corners
Batter my heart, three person'd God (Holy Sonnet 14) by John Donne
Batter my heart, three person'd God; for, you
Break of Day by John Donne
Tis true, 'tis day; what though it be?
Death, be not proud (Holy Sonnet 10) by John Donne
Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Hymn to God, My God, in My Sickness by John Donne
Since I am coming to that Holy room
The Anniversary by John Donne
All kings, and all their favourites
The Apparition by John Donne
When by thy scorn, O murd'ress, I am dead
The Baite by John Donne
Come live with mee, and bee my love,
The Good-Morrow by John Donne
I wonder by my troth, what thou and I
The Sun Rising by John Donne
Busy old fool, unruly Sun
To His Mistress Going to Bed by John Donne
Come, Madam, come, all rest my powers defy
To Sir Henry Wotton by John Donne
Sir, more than kisses, letters mingle souls


Further Reading

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Love's Philosophy
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Meeting at Night
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