A Blessing

James Wright

 
Just off the highway to Rochester, Minnesota,
Twilight bounds softly forth on the grass.
And the eyes of those two Indian ponies
Darken with kindness.
They have come gladly out of the willows
To welcome my friend and me.
We step over the barbed wire into the pasture
Where they have been grazing all day, alone.
They ripple tensely, they can hardly contain their happiness
That we have come.
They bow shyly as wet swans. They love each other.
There is no loneliness like theirs.
At home once more,
They begin munching the young tufts of spring in the darkness.
I would like to hold the slenderer one in my arms,
For she has walked over to me
And nuzzled my left hand.
She is black and white,
Her mane falls wild on her forehead,
And the light breeze moves me to caress her long ear
That is delicate as the skin over a girl's wrist.
Suddenly I realize
That if I stepped out of my body I would break
Into blossom.

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Featuring lines from
"A Blessing"
     
by James Wright
 
Copyright © 2005 James Wright. From Selected Poems. Reprinted with permission of Farrar, Straus, & Giroux.

Poems by This Author

As I Step Over a Puddle at the End of Winter, I Think of an Ancient Chinese Governor by James Wright
Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio by James Wright
In the Shreve High football stadium,
Living by the Red River by James Wright
Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy's Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota by James Wright
Northern Pike by James Wright
All right. Try this,
On the Skeleton of a Hound by James Wright
Nightfall, that saw the morning-glories float
The Secret of Light by James Wright
I am sitting contented and alone in a little park near the Palazzo Scaligere...
To the Saguaro Cactus Tree in the Desert Rain by James Wright
I had no idea the elf owl


Further Reading

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