Song of Myself, XI

Walt Whitman

 
Twenty-eight young men bathe by the shore,
Twenty-eight young men and all so friendly;
Twenty-eight years of womanly life and all so lonesome.
She owns the fine house by the rise of the bank,
She hides handsome and richly drest aft the blinds of the window.
Which of the young men does she like the best?
Ah the homeliest of them is beautiful to her.
Where are you off to, lady? for I see you,
You splash in the water there, yet stay stock still in your room.
Dancing and laughing along the beach came the twenty-ninth bather,
The rest did not see her, but she saw them and loved them.
The beards of the young men glisten'd with wet, it ran from their long
   hair,
Little streams pass'd over their bodies.
An unseen hand also pass'd over their bodies,
It descended trembling from their temples and ribs.
The young men float on their backs, their white bellies bulge to the sun,
   they do not ask who seizes fast to them,
They do not know who puffs and declines with the pendant and bending
   arch,
They do not think whom they souse with spray.
 

Poems by This Author

A child said, What is the grass? by Walt Whitman
A child said, What is the grass? fetching it to me with full
A Clear Midnight by Walt Whitman
This is thy hour O Soul, thy free flight into the wordless,
A Noiseless Patient Spider by Walt Whitman
A noiseless patient spider
A Woman Waits for Me by Walt Whitman
A woman waits for me, she contains all, nothing is lacking,
America by Walt Whitman
Centre of equal daughters, equal sons,
Among the Multitude by Walt Whitman
Among the men and women, the multitude
As I Walk These Broad Majestic Days by Walt Whitman
As I walk these broad majestic days of peace
Calamus [In Paths Untrodden] by Walt Whitman
In paths untrodden
Come Up From the Fields Father by Walt Whitman
Come up from the fields father, here's a letter from our Pete,
Come, said my Soul by Walt Whitman
Come, said my Soul
Continuities by Walt Whitman
Nothing is ever really lost, or can be lost
Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman
Flood-tide below me! I watch you face to face
Delicate Cluster by Walt Whitman
Delicate cluster! flag of teeming life
Election Day, November, 1884 by Walt Whitman
If I should need to name, O Western World, your powerfulest scene and show
Excelsior by Walt Whitman
Who has gone farthest? for I would go farther,
I Hear America Singing by Walt Whitman
I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,
I Sing the Body Electric by Walt Whitman
I sing the body electric,
Mannahatta by Walt Whitman
I was asking for something specific and perfect for my city
Miracles by Walt Whitman
Why, who makes much of a miracle
O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman
O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The
O Me! O Life! by Walt Whitman
On the Beach at Night Alone by Walt Whitman
On the beach at night alone
Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking by Walt Whitman
Out of the cradle endlessly rocking,
Out of the Rolling Ocean, the Crowd by Walt Whitman
Out of the rolling ocean, the crowd, came a drop gently to me
Passage to India by Walt Whitman
Singing my days
So Long by Walt Whitman
To conclude—I announce what comes after me
Sometimes with One I Love by Walt Whitman
Sometimes with one I love I fill myself with rage for fear I
Song of Myself, I, II, VI & LII by Walt Whitman
I celebrate myself,
Song of Myself, III by Walt Whitman
I have heard what the talkers were talking, the talk of the beginning and the end
Song of Myself, X by Walt Whitman
Alone far in the wilds and mountains I hunt,
Spirit that Form'd this Scene by Walt Whitman
Spirit that form'd this scene,
Spontaneous Me by Walt Whitman
Spontaneous me, Nature
The Indications [excerpt] by Walt Whitman
The words of the true poems give you more than poems
The Sleepers by Walt Whitman
I wander all night in my vision
The Untold Want by Walt Whitman
The untold want, by life and land ne’er granted
The Wound-Dresser by Walt Whitman
An old man bending I come among new faces
This Compost by Walt Whitman
Something startles me where I thought I was safest
Thoughts by Walt Whitman
OF the visages of things—And of piercing through
To a Locomotive in Winter by Walt Whitman
Thee for my recitative!
To Think of Time by Walt Whitman
To think of time—of all that retrospection
To You by Walt Whitman
Whoever you are, I fear you are walking the walks of dreams,
Unfolded Out of the Folds by Walt Whitman
Unfolded out of the folds of the woman, man comes unfolded, and is always to come unfolded
Washington's Monument, February, 1885 by Walt Whitman
Ah, not this marble, dead and cold
When I Heard at the Close of Day by Walt Whitman
When I heard at the close of the day how my name had been receiv'd
When I Heard the Learned Astronomer by Walt Whitman
When I heard the learn'd astronomer,
When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom'd by Walt Whitman
When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom'd
Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand by Walt Whitman
Whoever you are, holding me now in hand
World Below the Brine by Walt Whitman
The world below the brine


Further Reading

Poems About Difficult Love
A Love Song
by William Carlos Williams
Amorosa Erranza
by Julian T. Brolaski
Anna, Thy Charms
by Robert Burns
Be Near Me
by Faiz Ahmed Faiz
Caboose Thoughts
by Carl Sandburg
Conspiracy to Commit Larceny: A Recipe
by Jennifer Militello
Demon and The Dove
by Miguel Murphy
Designer Kisses
by Major Jackson
Dregs
by César Vallejo
Enemies
by Dante Micheaux
He would not stay for me, and who can wonder
by A. E. Housman
How Much?
by Carl Sandburg
I Am Not Yours
by Sara Teasdale
I Do Not Love Thee
by Caroline Elizabeth Sarah Norton
I have lived in your face
by Jean Valentine
I know I am but summer to your heart (Sonnet XXVII)
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
I'm A Fool To Love You
by Cornelius Eady
Last Words to Miriam
by D. H. Lawrence
Love
by Katy Lederer
Love in Fantastique Triumph satt
by Aphra Behn
Love's Secret
by William Blake
Loving and Beloved
by Sir John Suckling
My Love Sent Me a List
by Olena Kalytiak Davis
Never give all the heart
by W. B. Yeats
Not
by Sophie Cabot Black
One Art
by Elizabeth Bishop
Opal
by Amy Lowell
Our Bed Is Also Green
by Joshua Bell
Passer Mortuus Est
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Pericardium
by Joanna Klink
Poetry Anonymous
by Prageeta Sharma
Prayer
by Robert Glück
Red and Blue Planets
by Joni Wallace
Renouncement
by Alice Meynell
Sometimes with One I Love
by Walt Whitman
Sonnet 102 [If no love is, O God, what fele I so?]
by Petrarch
Sonnet 12 [Alas, so all things now do hold their peace]
by Petrarch
Talking to Patrizia
by Kenneth Koch
The Barrier
by Claude McKay
The Flight
by Sara Teasdale
The Heart Breaking
by Abraham Cowley
The More Loving One
by W. H. Auden
The Peace That So Lovingly Descends
by Noelle Kocot
The Unloved to His Beloved
by William Alexander Percy
They Romp with Wooly Canines
by Patricia Smith
They Were Not Kidding in the Fourteenth Century
by Maureen N. McLane
This Deepening Takes Place Again
by Emily Kendal Frey
To A Sea-Cliff
by Thomas Hardy
To Electra
by Robert Herrick
To His Coy Love
by Michael Drayton
UTOPIA: Love as Free as a Fountain
by Joe Hall
What Do I Care
by Sara Teasdale
What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why (Sonnet XLIII)
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Hand
by Walt Whitman
Witch-Wife
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
[I Failed Him and He Failed Me]
by Katie Ford