As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII [All the world's a stage]

William Shakespeare

 
Jaques to Duke Senior
                   
                          All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
 
Lines 139-166

Poems by This Author

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act II, Scene I [Over hill, over dale] by William Shakespeare
Over hill, over dale
Antony and Cleopatra, Act II, Scene II [The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne] by William Shakespeare
I will tell you
As You Like It, Act II, Scene VII [Blow, blow, thou winter wind] by William Shakespeare
Blow, blow, thou winter wind
Hamlet, Act I, Scene I [Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes] by William Shakespeare
Some say that ever 'gainst that season comes
Hamlet, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] by William Shakespeare
To be, or not to be: that is the question
Hamlet, Act III, Scene III [Oh my offence is rank] by William Shakespeare
O, my offence is rank, it smells to heaven
Hamlet, Act IV, Scene IV [How all occasions do inform against me] by William Shakespeare
How all occasions do inform against me
Henry V, Act III, Scene I [One more unto the breach, dear friends] by William Shakespeare
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more
Henry V, Act V, Scene III [What's he that wishes so?] by William Shakespeare
What's he that wishes so
King Lear, Act III, Scene II [Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks!] by William Shakespeare
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
Love's Labour's Lost, Act V, Scene 2 [Winter] by William Shakespeare
When icicles hang by the wall
Macbeth, Act I, Scene II [The merciless Macdonwald] by William Shakespeare
The merciless Macdonwald
Macbeth, Act IV, Scene I [Round about the cauldron go] by William Shakespeare
Round about the cauldron go
Romeo and Juliet, Act III, Scene II by William Shakespeare
Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds
Tempest, Act V, Scene I [Where the bee sucks, there suck I] by William Shakespeare
Where the bee sucks, there suck I
The Merchant of Venice, Act IV, Scene I [The quality of mercy is not strained] by William Shakespeare
The quality of mercy is not strained
The Winter's Tale Act IV, Scene II [When daffodils begin to peer] by William Shakespeare
When daffodils begin to peer
Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene III [O Mistress mine, where are you roaming?] by William Shakespeare
O Mistress mine, where are you roaming
Venus and Adonis [But, lo! from forth a copse] by William Shakespeare
But, lo! from forth a copse that neighbours by,
From you have I been absent in the spring... (Sonnet 98) by William Shakespeare
From you have I been absent in the spring,
How like a winter hath my absence been (Sonnet 97) by William Shakespeare
How like a winter hath my absence been
Let me not to the marriage of true minds (Sonnet 116) by William Shakespeare
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck (Sonnet 14) by William Shakespeare
Not from the stars do I my judgment pluck,
Not marble nor the guilded monuments (Sonnet 55) by William Shakespeare
Not marble nor the gilded monuments
Orpheus by William Shakespeare
Orpheus with his lute made trees
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? (Sonnet 18) by William Shakespeare
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea (Sonnet 65) by William Shakespeare
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea
That time of year thou mayst in me behold (Sonnet 73) by William Shakespeare
That time of year thou mayst in me behold
The expense of spirit in a waste of shame (Sonnet 129) by William Shakespeare
The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
They that have power to hurt and will do none (Sonnet 94) by William Shakespeare
They that have power to hurt and will do none
Three Songs by William Shakespeare
Come unto these yellow sands,
Tired with all these, for restful death I cry (Sonnet 66) by William Shakespeare
Tired with all these, for restful death I cry
When I consider every thing that grows (Sonnet 15) by William Shakespeare
When I consider every thing that grows
When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes (Sonnet 29) by William Shakespeare
When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes
When that I was and a little tiny boy by William Shakespeare
When that I was and a little tiny boy
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought (Sonnet 30) by William Shakespeare
When to the sessions of sweet silent thought


Further Reading

Carpe Diem
A Shropshire Lad, II
by A. E. Housman
Three Airs for the Beggar’s Opera, Air XXII
by John Gay
Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene III [O Mistress mine, where are you roaming?]
by William Shakespeare
A Psalm of Life
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
A Song On the End of the World
by Czeslaw Milosz
Another Song [Are they shadows that we see?]
by Samuel Daniel
Anything Can Happen
by Seamus Heaney
Archaic Torso of Apollo
by Rainer Maria Rilke
Barter
by Sara Teasdale
Be Drunk
by Charles Baudelaire
Carpe Diem: Poems for Making the Most of Time
Daphnis and Chloe
by Haniel Long
Days
by Ralph Waldo Emerson
Dreams
by Langston Hughes
Exact
by Rae Armantrout
First Fig
by Edna St. Vincent Millay
I Have News for You
by Tony Hoagland
I saw a man pursuing the horizon
by Stephen Crane
I tie my Hat—I crease my Shawl (443)
by Emily Dickinson
If—
by Rudyard Kipling
Live Blindly and Upon the Hour
by Trumbull Stickney
My life closed twice before its close (96)
by Emily Dickinson
My life has been the poem I would have writ
by Henry David Thoreau
O Me! O Life!
by Walt Whitman
O, Gather Me the Rose
by William Ernest Henley
Refresh. Refresh. Refresh.
by Noah Eli Gordon
Song of Myself, III
by Walt Whitman
Song to Celia
by Ben Jonson
Thanatopsis
by William Cullen Bryant
the gate
by Tadeusz Różewicz
The Layers
by Stanley Kunitz
The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost
To His Coy Mistress
by Andrew Marvell
To Rosa
by Abraham Lincoln
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time
by Robert Herrick
Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longam
by Ernest Dowson
We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths
by Philip James Bailey
When I consider every thing that grows (Sonnet 15)
by William Shakespeare
You Can't Have It All
by Barbara Ras
Poems For Graduation
Beyond the Years
by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Dreams
by Langston Hughes
First Gestures
by Julia Spicher Kasdorf
Friends, I Will Not Cease
by Vachel Lindsay
If—
by Rudyard Kipling
Invictus
by William Ernest Henley
Knows how to forget! (433)
by Emily Dickinson
My Heart Leaps Up
by William Wordsworth
The Character of a Happy Life
by Sir Henry Wotton
The Choir Invisible
by George Eliot
The Graduate Leaving College
by George Moses Horton
The Road Not Taken
by Robert Frost
The Writer
by Richard Wilbur
Today We Make the Poet's Words Our Own
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Up-Hill
by Christina Rossetti