The Convergence of the Twain

Thomas Hardy

 
(Lines on the loss of the "Titanic")
        
          

I

     In a solitude of the sea
     Deep from human vanity,
And the Pride of Life that planned her, stilly couches she.
     
     
        
          
          

II

     Steel chambers, late the pyres
     Of her salamandrine fires,
Cold currents thrid, and turn to rhythmic tidal lyres.
     
     
        
          
          

III

     Over the mirrors meant
     To glass the opulent
The sea-worm crawls--grotesque, slimed, dumb, indifferent.
     
     
        
          
          

IV

     Jewels in joy designed
     To ravish the sensuous mind
Lie lightless, all their sparkles bleared and black and blind.
     
     
        
          
          

V

     Dim moon-eyed fishes near
     Gaze at the gilded gear
And query: "What does this vaingloriousness down here?". . .
     
     
        
          
          

VI

     Well: while was fashioning
     This creature of cleaving wing,
The Immanent Will that stirs and urges everything
     
     
        
          
          

VII

     Prepared a sinister mate
     For her—so gaily great—
A Shape of Ice, for the time far and dissociate.
     
     
        
          
          

VIII

     And as the smart ship grew
     In stature, grace, and hue
In shadowy silent distance grew the Iceberg too.
     
     
        
          
          

IX

     Alien they seemed to be:
     No mortal eye could see
The intimate welding of their later history.
     
     
        
          
          

X

     Or sign that they were bent
     By paths coincident
On being anon twin halves of one August event,
     
     
        
          
          

XI

     Till the Spinner of the Years
     Said "Now!" And each one hears,
And consummation comes, and jars two hemispheres.
 

Poems by This Author

Afterwards by Thomas Hardy
When the Present has latched its postern behind my
An August Midnight by Thomas Hardy
A shaded lamp and a waving blind
At the Entering of the New Year by Thomas Hardy
Our songs went up and out the chimney
At the Piano by Thomas Hardy
A Woman was playing
Channel Firing by Thomas Hardy
That night your great guns, unawares,
During Wind and Rain by Thomas Hardy
They sing their dearest songs
Hap by Thomas Hardy
If but some vengeful god would call to me
Her Father by Thomas Hardy
I met her, as we had privily planned,
How Great My Grief by Thomas Hardy
How great my grief, my joys how few
I Found Her Out There by Thomas Hardy
I found her out there
In the Garden by Thomas Hardy
We waited for the sun
The Darkling Thrush by Thomas Hardy
I leant upon a coppice gate
The Glimpse by Thomas Hardy
She sped through the door
The Going by Thomas Hardy
Why did you give no hint that night
The High-School Lawn by Thomas Hardy
Gray prinked with rose
The Interloper by Thomas Hardy
There are three folk driving in a quaint old chaise
The Man He Killed by Thomas Hardy
"Had he and I but met
The Oxen by Thomas Hardy
Christmas Eve, and twelve of the clock
The Ruined Maid by Thomas Hardy
"O 'Melia, my dear, this does everything crown!
The Subalterns by Thomas Hardy
The Voice by Thomas Hardy
Woman much missed, how you call to me, call to me,
The Year's Awakening by Thomas Hardy
How do you know that the pilgrim track
To A Sea-Cliff by Thomas Hardy


Further Reading

Related Poems
Dirge
by Thomas Lovell Beddoes
The Night Ship
by Timothy Donnelly
The Song of Despair
by Pablo Neruda